University Writing Center

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Welcome to the University Writing Center!

We are here to help you become a more confident writer by providing individual consultations with expert peer-tutors. We would like to be your writing resource from your freshmen classes through graduate school. We work on papers from all disciplines, not just writing classes. Best of all, the writing center is a free service to students and faculty of the University of Utah. We want to help you develop strategies to make you a better writer and help you see your potential as an academic author. You can also join us on Facebook: University of Utah Writing Center!

Undergraduate Writing Centers will open for Spring Semester on January 21st

The Marriott Library Writing Center is located on the 2nd floor

Hours: Monday – Thursday; 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. and Friday 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 


 The Writing Center at the SFEBB is located in room 1171

(801) 587.9122

Hours: Monday – Friday; 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.  


 

The Graduate Writing Center opens for Spring Semester on January 13th

The Graduate Writing Center is located on the first floor of the Marriott Library in room 1180B. Check on-line schedule for hours

Please access and fill out the security form before coming to the Graduate Writing Center: www.librarysecurity.edu

Graduate students can make one-hour appointments. You can meet in person or work through email with one of our graduate writing tutors. Contact Matt Driscoll at matthew.w.driscoll@utah.edu or Shena McAuliffe at shena.mcauliffe@gmail.com.

 

Faculty Writing Fellow Services:

Faculty and Graduate editing services are available for grants, articles for publication, research proposals and reports. Please contact on the following: 

Zeb Pischnotte at: z.pischnotte@utah.edu

Jesse Houf at:   jesse.houf@utah.edu


 

Free Workshops

To register for workshops, go to: https://eventregistration.tools.lib.utah.edu

 

Introduction to Library Resources for Graduate TAs & Instructors

January 24th 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1735

Need a library refresher course? Not sure where to refer your students when they need research and writing help?

This workshop will discuss the various resources available at the Marriott Library and provide strategies for directing

your students to the ones that will help them best. This session will also discuss strategies for teaching time management,

good research habits, and problem-solving. Graduate TAs and instructors from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.

 

Scholarship Applications: Honing Your CV and Personal Statement

January 29th 5-6 pm -Maureen Clark- ML 1725

As deadlines approach, learn some useful techniques to improve your chances of receiving scholarship money or program admission.

A professional and a well-crafted personal statement can take you a long way. Feel free to bring copies of your personal statement to workshop.

 

Introduction to Navigating Research Databases

January 31st 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1009

Databases provide the most current research in your discipline. This workshop will introduce to the main interdisciplinary databases, provide tricks and tools

for conducting effective searches, develop keywords and search terms, show you how to organize your research in the database, and introduce you to resources

to help you use discipline-specific databases and library contacts. Please bring a research assignment/paper assignment from one of your classes to find sources for.

All international students and WRTG 1010/2010 students are encouraged to attend.

 

Having a 'Moment': 10-min Teaching Activities to Improve Writing and Research Skills

February 7th 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1140

Helping your students improve their reading, writing, and research skills doesn't have to be a big time investment. This workshop will model several short activities

to incorporate into your regular classroom repertoire that will promote the reading and writing fluency and academic awareness students need to conduct and produce

effective research. Graduate TAs and instructors from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.

 

Overcoming Writing Anxiety

February 12th 5-6pm -Lindsey Appell- ML 1725

"I'm blocked!" "I'm stuck staring at a blank page." "I'm just not a writer." What do all these thoughts have in common? They can all be linked to anxiety.

Whether the pressure of a high-stakes paper has you stressed out or your identity as someone "who just isn't a writer" has you hitting a brick wall, this workshop will introduce

you to some techniques to help you identify the source of your writing anxiety and begin to overcome it.

 

Introduction to Writing Annotated Bibliographies

February 14th 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1009

Annotated bibliographies are a great way organizational tool to analyze your sources, practice summarizing skills, decide which information to use in your work, and cite your work.

This workshop will provide strategies for critical reading, summarizing, and citation for creating annotated bibliographies. Please bring a research assignment/paper from one of your

classes to annotate sources for. All international students and WRTG 1010/2010 students are encouraged to attend.

 

Addressing Plagiarism

February 21st 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1170

Plagiarism is one of the most pervasive and uncomfortable topics in higher education. More often than blatant "cheating", plagiarism is indicative of cultural understandings or level

of academic preparedness. This session will present current concepts surrounding student plagiarism, instructional strategies for preventing it, and strategies and protocol for addressing

plagiarism with a student. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute to a peer-led discussion to share their successes and get peer feedback on successes and challenges they

have had addressing plagiarism. Please come prepared to contribute to this discussion. Graduate TAs and instructors from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.

 

Strategies for Evaluating & Incorporating Evidence in Academic Writing

February 28th 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1009

Choosing and using expert sources in your research is challenging. This session will offer strategies for sorting, evaluating, and choosing the best resources for your research and guidance

on selecting appropriate information to include. This session will address incorporating sources into your own work by exploring strategies like: transitions, signal phrases, summarizing/paraphrasing/quoting,

and in-text citation. Please bring a draft of a course research assignment/paper and several sources to work with from one of your classes. All international students and WRTG 1010/2010 students are encouraged to attend.

 

Teaching Paraphrasing & Summarizing Skills

March 7th 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1140

Effective paraphrasing and summarizing are essential skills for undergraduate researchers and writers. They are also difficult skills for students to master! This session will present general activities

and strategies for teaching paraphrasing and summarizing. This workshop is not discipline-specific, though some basic comparisons will be made (e.g., between the humanities and STEM fields).

Because writing is discipline-specific, participants will have the opportunity to contribute to a peer-led discussion to offer insight as to how paraphrasing and summarizing are used in their disciplines

and get peer feedback on the successes and challenges they have had teaching discipline writing. Please come prepared to contribute to this discussion. Graduate TAs and instructors from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.

 

Scholarship Applications: Honing Your CV and Personal Statement

March 19th 5-6 pm -Maureen Clark- ML 1725

As deadlines approach, learn some useful techniques to improve your chances of receiving scholarship money or program admission. A professional and a well-crafted personal statement can take you a long way.

Feel free to bring copies of your personal statement to workshop.

 

Responding to Student Writing

March 21st 2-4 pm -Lindsay Hansen- ML 1170

But I'm not a writing teacher! Undergraduate coursework provides students with their first exposure to writing norms within their discipline. As an instructor, providing feedback to undergraduate writers in that discipline

is something we all have to do. This workshop will introduce strategies for approaching student writing, determining which facets of writing to focus on your students, and offering constructive, limited feedback.

This session will also discuss developing student 'author identity' and ways to help students manage writing anxiety. Participants will have the opportunity to contribute to a peer-led discussion about the successes and

challenges of teaching writing as part of the discipline. Graduate TAs and instructors from all disciplines are encouraged to attend.

 

Beyond the First Draft: Revision Strategies

April 9th 5-6 pm -Lindsey Appell- ML 1725

You may think that you write better the night before the deadline, but writing is a process. If your 3 a.m. first draft is so good, just imagine what your final product could be if you took the time to revise!

This workshop will introduce useful strategies for revision, including utilizing professor/classmate feedback and approaching your paper with new eyes.


New Policy for required visits:

Instructors who require their students to come to the Writing Center will be able to have the tutor will stamp the student's paper with the official Writing Center stamp.

For privacy reasons we are unable to divulge the details of the session, but we can verify that a student has had a consultation. Thank you for supporting the Writing Center!

 
Last Updated: 3/12/14